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2 technologies in our daily future


Over the past 6 years we have been reading, investigating, engaging and plotting ideas around the potentialities of combining technical solutions.

It is indeed an exercise that many major consulting firms have been undertaking proposing potential futuristic scenarios.

What in our perspective is sometimes lacking is the description of the path to go from today to the future: this is what we call the “NEXT” step!!

Building upon the ideas and topics discussed in our previous posts on Disruptive Energy and Intelligence of Things, it is our fundamental strategic pillar at Bridging Value. So let me walk you to an interesting exercise of convergence.

Wireless Electricity

Aren’t you all tired of having to desperately look for a plug to charge your phone? Don’t you grow with the terror of your toddlers plugging some metallic object by chance in the “only” outlet you forget to protect? What about being regularly concerned about tripping over an extension cord while walking around the house? And at last, why our cities are full of those unaesthetic poles with cables running in every directions?

Some of these frustrations were channeled to create WiTricity: a Massachusetts-based start-up designing solutions to wirelessly charge various appliances. The base technology is magnetic resonance.

Indeed, in their early stages, their focus was on unwiring every possible appliance. In past few years though they targeted automotive batteries, betting on BEV’s for the future of mobility.

Here is a McKinsey interview with Alex Gruzen, WiTricity CEO.

At present, England and South Korea have been experimenting with direct solutions into their local markets particularly with respect to public transportation.

In England the Highway administration after having announced in 2014 a plan to pilot wireless charging in certain segments of their network, has launched in 2018 a “£40 million for projects that look at creating public areas to charge electric cars or wireless charging for commercial vehicles

In the meantime, in